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Only 60 days to November 3rd.  Where will you be?*  Standing in line waiting to vote in person?  I expect my mail-in ballot to arrive at my home in about two weeks. I will fill it out, double-check that it is filled out properly, and although it is not required here in Pennsylvania, will put a stamp on it for luck and as a contribution to our cash-poor postal system. Then I’ll mail it right back. I will be mailing in my ballot for only the second time because of the pandemic.

I’m thinking I’ll dedicate my vote this year to the memory of my mother and her first vote. That was in 1925, when she was twenty-one and women’s right to vote was six years old. She prized that privilege and never missed voting through her 97 years.

ElderChicks retains our non-partisan policy in what we publish, respecting individual choice. But how, whether, and why we vote is something every one of us will be thinking about for the next two months. How much does that right mean to you? Tell us here.

We are very aware that EC has many readers and often writers from outside the U.S.A. We love being international, and we realize that those of you from other countries are also paying attention to our upcoming election. How about your voting customs and regulations? Please let us know!

*If you have any questions about whether you’re registered, how to vote by mail, etc. please visit vote.org to get all your questions answered.

If you live in Pennsylvania, this might be your first time voting by mail. I will be glad to help you request a ballot if you live in Center City Philadelphia. Please Email me at linkatz@gmail.com . You should also check (after about 12 days) to see if you are in the system — next step after your request for a mail-in ballot has been acknowledged. Go to Www.votesPA.com/mailballotstatus . If it says “pending” you will likely receive your ballot on time.

I have voted in every election. It’s as thrilling at age 70 as it was the first time. It is astounding how many people do not exercise their right to vote. What’s with that?

Voting is paramount to citizenship in the U.S. It determines the politicians who govern, who decides major policies influencing our lives. In addition to federal laws, it determines the state and municipal laws. As naturalized citizens leave their swearing-in ceremony, they have the opportunity to register to vote at tables set up at the exit.