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Oh, my! How fast the changes come! Can we ever keep up? Every woman I know recognizes gender discrimination in the workplace. A smaller number of personal acquaintances recall abuse, ranging from slurs and innuendos to outright physical or sexual assault. Most of the men I know, including all of the men in The New Senior Man, are as shocked and disgusted as the rest of us. What do you make of what’s happening? What has you experience or observation been? And where, do you think, do we go from here? Tell us.

Work Together by Mohamed

To be honest it doesn’t make sense to me. We’re supposed to be this super advanced species that are going to Mars in the next decade, yet we still discriminate by gender. It just doesn’t add up. I think a change would only come when both sides work together. Women standing up for their rights and man not objectifying women. If they just took a second to stop harassing their coworkers and admired them for the work they do, gender discrimination wouldn’t be what is today.

I am 73 years old and worked for 62 years. I saw abuse and harassment and experienced it. Some of it was from sexual predators who took advantage of their power and some of it was just from assholes. Everything from putdowns to attempted sexual attack. I think this was covered up a lot and accepted either because “boys will be boys” or because women were afraid of being fired. I also saw women use their “feminine wiles” to manipulate men and get ahead. I think all of this behavior in the work place needs to stop. In terms of the current situations, I think where men have abused their power in the work place to abuse women, they should be fired and women should be able to speak out with no consequences. But I am bothered by the claims of “abuse” where there is no power relationship. It’s the difference between Conyers taking advantage of interns and employees and Franken being accused of putting his hand on the butt of someone getting their picture taken or interacting with someone who is his peer. So I think each situation has to be judged on its own merits. The unfortunate thing is that people go from one extreme to another, and can’t deal with nuance. I think it will backfire against women who won’t get promoted or have opportunities to advance on their own merit.

I know that I raised a few eyebrows when I titled a recent October Years blog post — Why Read Kids’ Stuff When the Real Thing is Available?
With that tongue-in-cheek (sort of) claim I was introducing a story that begins at a 50th high-school reunion — an event that for some includes resurrecting old feelings and reviving long-dormant daydreams, which sometimes produces hints of an unexpected geriatric adolescence.
The Tanner Chronicles stories I tell, eleven of them to date, depict what I consider the ‘Real Thing,’ that time of late-life I call the October Years, when many of us face a new, challenging landscape — a place where tried and trusted answers may no longer apply.
That universe of aging, often-solitary seniors is larger than you might think. Those October survivors have spent decades dealing with life ‘up close and personal,’ creating experiences that lend depth and texture to their stories. Each of them is coping with unforeseen, life-changing circumstances — a spouse’s infirmity, financial realities that threaten their very relationship, incompatible priorities for their future, and other challenges.
And then there are the lonely ones — seeking the ‘someone’ who can help him or her overcome the emptiness of life lived alone. Granted, their stories are apt to reflect the dark side of their circumstances. But they are a resilient bunch, those October friends of mine, able make the most of an uncomfortable situation.
For a closer look at that Tanner world I invite readers to check out the following websites. Ebook and paperback editions of the books are available on the Amazon Author’s page.
—  Gil Stewart’s Amazon Author’s Page
Finally, be aware that in the course of those Tanner Chronicles stories the reader is apt to meet someone they recognize, perhaps someone who looks a lot like them.